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future of tech mobility culture

‘eCabs mission is to change Malta’s mobility culture’

eCabs was set up to provide a feasible personal transportation alternative to people and kick-start a change in mobility culture and mentality, CEO Matthew Bezzina says.

In its 10th year of operations, eCabs today boasts impressive growth, making the company one of the leading transport solutions providers in Malta with aspirations to go international. eCabs CEO Matthew Bezzina speaks to The Sunday Times of Malta about his ongoing quest for higher standards in service provision and how technology has enabled the business to evolve.

“Today, 10 years down the line, we look back with pride and satisfaction. But we also look forward to the next revolution we want to trigger.”

He points out that like many other ventures, there were many challenges along the way. If he had to pin down one critical success factor that is at the heart of the company’s growth results, it would be the nexus between vision, commercial strategy and the implementation of a business plan.

“Coming from the tightly-knit logistics environment, for us, planning is a religion that we practise at all levels of our company: from the boardroom to our facilities management function.

“Equally important was our reinvestment culture. We were never after enjoying the fruits of our labour by reaping them but by reinvesting every single cent back into the business to make it stronger, more resilient and future-ready.”

Delivering change in mobility culture by bringing people together

Today, eCabs’ fleet runs into hundreds of cabs and it is by far the largest such operation in Malta, employing over 700 individuals across all departments.

“Our logistics centre team runs the opera­tion with clinical precision, based on a technology platform developed and supported by our brilliant tech team. The latter provides both consumer apps for booking and driver apps for service fulfilment by our highly trained and competent drivers. These are all supported by our call centre operators. This is the beauty of eCabs: the ability to deliver change in mobility by bringing people together,” he says.

Mr Bezzina refers to the company’s control centre as the heart of eCabs’ operational setup, a melting pot of all the activity driving eCabs.

“Our logistics and control centre, which operates on a 24/7 basis and is run at exceptional efficiency levels, optimises service levels and our operational capacity. At any point in time, 20 people – who handle all the incoming bookings and requests that come through our website, through e-mail, phone, social media or our mobile app – man the centre. The control centre gives us the visibility in real time of all our fleet, and the IT platform enables our operators and drivers by devising the best route possible for them.”

Smart technology

Perhaps one aspect that defines eCabs is its use of ‘smart technology’. Mr Bezzina stresses that from day one, eCabs has always been run as a technology company that seeks to enable passenger transport solutions to address congestion challenges in Malta.

“We intend exposing our achievements on the international stage to tap into the scale of markets beyond our shores. “It is true that we move people. But what differentiates us from other operators is that in our case, IT lies at the heart of our vision. It can be considered to be the nervous system of our operation.

“As a matter of fact, our intellectual property has grown to the extent that we are now spinning off our ICT operations into a dedicated company in order to enable it to provide services to third parties, locally and internationally. With this in mind, when we describe our technology as ‘smart’, we mean that the technology is an intelligent one that is constantly aggregating the mobility data that we have been accumulating over the years to improve the services that we offer.”

A highly human resources-intensive environment

eCabs has grown to the extent that, like many other companies, it has felt the need to hire workers of other nationalities. In fact, the real challenge is not to retain these workers. But to find workers who are committed enough to enter this sector.

“Today, the talk of ‘foreign workers’ needs to stop. There are no such thing as ‘foreign’ workers. There are workers who decide to make Malta their home, they decide to commit to working and they work. At eCabs, we have an encouraging number of non-Maltese workers with us who receive continuous training, assisted by our technology and communications infrastructure. As we speak, we are striving to widen the catchment of our workforce to attract talent from all walks of life with the only underlying pre-requisites being the willingness to learn and the unquestionable commitment to passenger safety and service delivery.”

Human resources was always the biggest challenge for eCabs, especially when the company was starting up. The company acknowledges that it operates in a highly human resources-intensive environment, and the limited pool of people willing to work in a disciplined and structured environment is somewhat challenging, albeit not impossible.

“But even here we changed culture and we’ve managed to the extent that today, even women are applying to join us as drivers. Today, in fact, one of my most cherished statistics is that 20 per cent of our drivers are women. We not only believe in equal opportunity, we enable it in practice.”

A change in mobility culture and mentality

Another challenge is the fact that eCabs operates in an environment where the roads are becoming busier and busier. Mr Bezzina believes that the current infrastructural works may provide a temporary relief, especially for congested hotspots. However, this is not the optimal long-term solution in which the major investment should be made.

“The fact of the matter is that our roads are not able to take on the quantum of vehicles being put on them. Any long-term strategy should be anchored around changing culture, not merely burdening further the infrastructure to accommodate the accumulation of further congestion. And when you change the mind-set of people, you can achieve greater things.

“This is what we have been doing here at eCabs – promoting the reality that a change in culture and mentality is indeed possible. With the use of technology, we are making it increasingly easy and cheaper for people to be encouraged to leave their car and start using cabs more. It is not a change that will happen overnight, but it will take years. But we’re managing because if we weren’t, we would have been out of business a long time ago. If we can do it, so do the rest.”

Looking to the future

Looking to the future, Mr Bezzina sees eCabs’ commercial vision as second to none, and said that a lot will be happening over the coming months to reinvent the industry.

“I believe that our proposition, based on best practice and operated through an integrated IT infrastructure that we have deve­loped in-house and built and rebuilt over these past 10 years, is a unique one. The huge amount of movement data we collate every day contributes to a constant improvement of the service at all levels, particularly for route optimisation.”

In the coming months the company will be engaged on initiatives at all levels. From deploying new features on its consumer app, to the provision of new transport products, up to the internationalisation of its business model.

“As eCabs is growing into one of the largest corporates on this island, we intend exposing our achievements on the international stage to tap into the scale of markets beyond our shores,” Mr Bezzina says.

In the press:

The Sunday Times of Malta

transport

The real value of transport

By Matthew Bezzina, eCabs CEO

Given that the use of cars is so accessible, our idea of the true value and cost of transport is skewed.

Our society is driven by a lifestyle where cars are protagonists. We instil the idea in our children that, as soon as they turn 18, they have to get their driving licence. And own their car.

The car has become a must and is now an intrinsic part of the social fabric. But we have reached the extreme where owning a car is not just an expense for its owner. It also carries a cost on the infrastructure and, as we are lately also finding out, on our health.

Every morning, many of us walk to our car, start the engine and drive to work. And then, after a day’s work, we take the car back home. If you stop to think about it, you would realise that many of such people’s cars are lying idle for 95 percent of the time.

Yet, they are still paying for fuel, road tax and insurance, not to mention maintenance costs.

Changing patterns

From an infrastructure point of view, the reality is that, nowadays, no matter the location, vehicles are constantly occupying space on the roads for free. Prime space which, in today’s terms, is an asset that comes at a high premium.

In reality, we will never know the real value of transport until we are forced to radically change the patterns of how we commute. A change so drastic it will bring a whole upheaval in our personal lifestyles. How we plan our days, where we spend most of our time and how we interact with family and friends.

Unfortunately, for this to happen, those in government will need to make difficult decisions.

Even more unfortunate, however, is Malta’s current political environment where society is based on a bi-party system.

This could possibly be the main reason why a long-term vision for transport, if there ever was one, can and will never be put into action for fear of losing precious votes.

“Our idea of the true value and cost of transport is skewed”

People are comfortable and upsetting this feel-good factor will have adverse effects on popularity ratings. We have grown accustomed for far too long to free parking and free congestion zones. Which are becoming even more congested.

We use our car every day and at any time. Cars have become the be-all-and-end-all. And, without serious political will and consensus, a long-term plan that can start redressing the situation will never be possible.

Given that the use of cars is so accessible, our idea of the true value and cost of transport is, therefore, skewed. If people experienced the real cost, many would become sensitised to the extent that they would start adjusting their driving patterns.

The point of departure would be quantifying the real value of transport by looking at the two main variables of space and time.

Alternative modes of transport

Space in terms of all the vehicles occupying space on the roads. And time as in what period of the day and for how long they are used. Optimising these two variables and assessing the opportunities available is key to a solid start in addressing our transport problems on a national scale.

Truth be told, there are many people who have started to opt for alternative modes of transport.

The ferry service in the harbour area and the Sliema to Valletta route are already ingrained in our daily lifestyles.

There is increased use of more reliable cab services. And many are those who are reverting to the use of bicycles or scooters.

The Barrakka lift could be free of charge to incentivise those entering Valletta using such clean modes of transport. The infrastructure catering for these alternative means cannot be compromised but made more enabling.

No problem comes without a solution. Those who are empowered to make decisions have enough power to also decide on issues that could be a bit difficult but that, in the long run, would start addressing a problem that is close to saturation point.

Eventually, a situation will be reached where there will be continuity, irrespective of the party in government. That will be the day when traffic will stop being a political football.

In the press:

The Times of Malta

largest corporates in Malta

‘We aim to grow into one of the largest corporates in Malta’

eCabs CEO says that they aim to grow the Company into one of the largest corporates in Malta, exposing their achievements on the international stage to tap into the scale of markets beyond the island’s shores.

eCabs is a household brand in the local transport industry. Its impressive growth and significant operational footprint make it the first private company to reach high standards in service provision and technology application in the sector. BUSINESS TODAY met the company’s CEO, Matthew Bezzina, for an insight into how his business evolved into the leading transport solutions provider in Malta with internationalisation aspirations.

What was the idea behind eCabs, which started out as a new taxi company and has evidently turned itself into major operation within a short span of time?

Our idea was born out of the blend of two elements: firstly our academic formation in business and law which enabled us to structure our approach to problems and secondly our vision for shaping a business which uses technology to revolutionise a sector conspicuous for its failings and shoddy service. One can easily sum up the idea into an aspiration to be a prime mover in the solution to what was already becoming a huge traffic problem. We wanted to provide a feasible personal transportation alternative to people and kick-start a change in culture and mentality.

Today 10 years down the line we look back with pride and satisfaction, but we also look forward to the next revolution we want to trigger.

Which growth path did eCabs follow, and what is the secret behind being successful in this industry?

Like many other successful ventures, we faced a tall order of challenges along the way. If I had to pin down one critical success factor that is at the heart of our growth results was the nexus between our vision, the commercial strategy and the implementation of our business plan. Coming from the tightly knit logistics environment, for us planning is a religion which we practice at all levels of our company: from the boardroom all the way through to our facilities management function. Equally important was our re-investment culture.

We were never after enjoying the fruits of our labour by reaping them but by re-investing every single penny back into the business to make it stronger, more resilient and future ready.

eCabs taxis are a common sight on Maltese roads, so your capacity must be significant. How many cabs are there in your fleet, and how many workers do you employ?

Our fleet, running into hundreds of cabs, is by far the largest-owned in Malta. It is certainly the most dynamic one in terms of growth, diversity and refresh. However, the fleet is merely a tool in our business and its heart is our vibrant workforce.

We employ over 700 individuals across all departments each of which has a crucial function in the value chain of eCabs. Our logistics centre team runs the operation with clinical precision, based on a technology platform developed and supported by our brilliant tech team. The team provides both consumer apps for booking and driver apps for service fulfilment by our highly trained and competent drivers. They are all supported by our call centre operators. This is the beauty of eCabs: the ability to deliver change in mobility by bringing people together.

Driving past Regional Road one can see a digital map of Malta in your offices. What is this for?

Well… that is the melting pot of our operations, our logistics and control centre which operates on a 24×7 basis and run at exceptional efficiency levels intended to optimise service levels and our operational capacity. At any point in time our control centre is manned by around 20 people. They handle all the incoming bookings and requests that come through our website, through email, phone, social media or our mobile app.

The control centre gives us the visibility in real time of all our fleet and the IT platform enables our operators and drivers by devising the best route possible for them. Under this bonnet lies a complex web of algorithms to optimise all of this operation in real-time even at the peak operational levels.

You regularly emphasise that you make use of ‘smart technology’. What is this, and how does eCabs incorporate this technology in the way it operates?

From day one, I have always looked at eCabs as a technology company enabling passenger transport solutions to address congestion challenges in Malta. It is true that we move people but what differentiates us from other operators is that in our case, IT lies at the heart of our vision and can be considered to be the nervous system of our operation. As a matter of fact, our intellectual property has grown to the extent that we are now spinning off our ICT operations into a dedicated company in order to enable it to provide services to third parties, locally and internationally.

With this in mind, when we describe our technology as ‘smart’, we mean that the technology is an intelligent one that is constantly aggregating the mobility data that we have been accumulating over the years to improve the services that we offer.

What is your opinion of foreign workers in Malta, and do you face challenges retaining workers?

Today, the talk of ‘foreign workers’ needs to stop. There is no such thing as ‘foreign’ workers. There are workers who decide to make Malta their home, they decide to commit to working and they work. The challenge is not to retain workers. Rather it it to find workers who are committed enough to enter this sector. At eCabs, we have an encouraging number of non-Maltese workers with us who receive continuous training, assisted by our technology and communications infrastructure.

As we speak, we are striving to widen the catchment of our workforce to attract talent from all walks of life with the only underlying pre-requisites being the willingness to learn and the unquestionable commitment to passenger safety and service delivery.

Malta’s roads are becoming busier and busier. Do you feel that the government’s investment in road infrastructure is helping with the traffic situation?

While the current works may provide temporary relief, especially for congested hotspots, my experience-based opinion is that this is not the optimal long-term solution in which the major investment should be made. The fact of the matter is that our roads are not able to take on the volume of vehicles being put on them. And any long-term strategy should be anchored around changing culture, rather than merely burdening further the infrastructure to accommodate the accumulation of further congestion. And when you change the mindset of people, you can achieve greater things. This is what we have been doing here at eCabs – promoting the reality that a change in culture and mentality is indeed possible.

With the use of technology, we are making it increasingly easy and cheaper for people to be encouraged to leave their car and start using cabs more. It is not a change that will happen overnight; it will take years. But we’re managing because if we weren’t, we would have been out of business a long time ago. If we can do it, so can the rest.

What is the biggest challenge of running a large business like yours in Malta?

The biggest challenge that we found when starting up eCabs was human resources. We operate in a highly human resources-intensive environment and the limited pool of people willing to work in a disciplined and structured environment is somewhat challenging albeit not impossible. But even here we changed culture and we’ve managed to the extent that today, even women are applying to join us as drivers.

Today in fact, one of my most cherished statistics is that 20% of our drivers are women. We do not only believe in equal opportunity but we enable it in practice. I assure you that many other challenges fill up our day-to-day operations but really and truly management is there to find solutions and not to complain about challenges. It’s a mind-set that we try to ingrain across eCabs.

Since eCabs was started, a number of new taxi companies have also sprouted around the island. How does eCabs keep itself ahead of the competition?

We started off this industry in Malta. I am personally very satisfied to see that what we started grew even outside of eCabs. Commercially our vision is second to none and we shall certainly be reinventing the industry again in the coming months. Having said that, even in the current model, I believe that our proposition is a unique one. The service we offer is fully compliant with regulation, based on best practice and with the most diverse of booking channels – phone, website, app and social channels – all backed by an integrated IT infrastructure that we have developed in-house and that we have built and re-built over these past 10 years.

This is coupled with the huge amount of movement data we have been collating which contributes to a constant improvement of the service at all levels, particularly for route optimisation. Competition will strengthen us as it makes us seek better efficiency levels and more innovative service delivery enhancements.

What plans do you have for the future of the company – any projects in the pipeline?

Our pipeline is full of initiatives at all levels. From deploying new features on our consumer app, to the provision of new transport products up to the internationalisation of our business model. We aim to grow the Company into one of the largest corporates on this island and exposing our achievements on the international stage to tap into the scale of markets beyond our shores. So watch the eCabs space: it will be an exciting journey.

In the press:

Business Today